A Kneel-In for Equal Employment: A Civil Rights Protest in Windsor

2021-01-15T14:51:55-05:00January 13th, 2021|Tags: , , |

One of the many civil rights protests that occurred in the summer of 1963 took place at Carville’s Restaurant in Windsor. It was part of an effort by Hartford's North End Community Action Project (NECAP), which galvanized local civil rights leaders to take a more confrontational approach towards publicizing and solving greater Hartford’s racial issues.

Volunteer Profile: Carlton Parkinson

2019-02-13T12:04:20-05:00November 28th, 2018|Tags: , , , , |

One of our dear volunteers, Carlton Parkinson, passed away two weeks ago. We’ll miss him tremendously at Windsor Historical Society. He inspired hundreds of school children to understand and to care a little more about the place they live in. We're re-publishing an interview we conducted with Carl in 2010 in his memory.

Soldiers of the Soil

2019-02-13T12:13:56-05:00June 25th, 2018|Tags: , , , , , , |

What would it be like to come to this town after a harrowing ocean voyage and adjust to a new climate, new foods, new working conditions, and racial prejudice, as well? Fay Clarke Johnson tells the story of Jamaicans who left their lovely, temperate island to find work in the Connecticut River Valley during WWII in her 1995 book Soldiers of the Soil.

Moses and Oliver Mitchell: Portraits of Two Late 18th-Century African Americans in Windsor

2019-02-13T12:16:24-05:00February 12th, 2018|Tags: , |

The first black household in the area of Windsor north of the Farmington River was probably that of Moses Mitchell, who bought his first recorded piece of property here in 1791. Moses's brother Oliver came from East Windsor in 1797, buying a piece of property with "two dwelling houses" on the west bank of the Connecticut River near the Scantic Ferry.

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