Soldiers of the Soil

2021-03-15T14:15:33-04:00June 25th, 2018|Tags: , , , , , , |

What would it be like to come to this town after a harrowing ocean voyage and adjust to a new climate, new foods, new working conditions, and racial prejudice, as well? Fay Clarke Johnson tells the story of Jamaicans who left their lovely, temperate island to find work in the Connecticut River Valley during WWII in her 1995 book Soldiers of the Soil.

Moses and Oliver Mitchell: Portraits of Two Late 18th-Century African Americans in Windsor

2021-03-15T14:15:51-04:00February 12th, 2018|Tags: , |

The first black household in the area of Windsor north of the Farmington River was probably that of Moses Mitchell, who bought his first recorded piece of property here in 1791. Moses's brother Oliver came from East Windsor in 1797, buying a piece of property with "two dwelling houses" on the west bank of the Connecticut River near the Scantic Ferry.

Remembering Sarah

2021-03-15T14:16:26-04:00June 12th, 2017|Tags: , , , |

They worked in the kitchen from dawn to dusk cooking, washing, and ironing. They emptied chamber pots every morning after sleeping in basements and attics. And they were supposed to be invisible whenever guests came calling. Who are ‘they’? They are the slaves of Windsor’s Chaffee family.

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