Seating the Meetinghouse

2019-02-13T11:23:48-05:00June 12th, 2018|Tags: , |

Across the road from the Strong-Howard House stands the First Church of Windsor. Looking back on the church’s history, there was a peculiar practice called “seating the meetinghouse” whereby all the parishioners were assigned their seats according to their wealth, position in the community, age, sex, etc.

Windsor’s Irish Legacy

2019-02-13T14:16:42-05:00March 12th, 2018|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Everyone pretends to be a wee bit Irish on March 17, but Windsor has a stronger connection to the Emerald Isle than one day of shamrocks and green attire. In fact, Irish immigrants flocked to Windsor during the 19th century looking for work and a safe place to raise their families. Twenty percent of Windsor’s population was first or second-generation Irish by 1860.

Moses and Oliver Mitchell: Portraits of Two Late 18th-Century African Americans in Windsor

2019-02-13T12:16:24-05:00February 12th, 2018|Tags: , |

The first black household in the area of Windsor north of the Farmington River was probably that of Moses Mitchell, who bought his first recorded piece of property here in 1791. Moses's brother Oliver came from East Windsor in 1797, buying a piece of property with "two dwelling houses" on the west bank of the Connecticut River near the Scantic Ferry.

Poquonock Roots and Spiritual Wings: Missionary Traditions in the Marshall Family

2019-02-13T12:20:38-05:00November 6th, 2017|Tags: , , , , , |

Carrie Phelps Marshall Kendrick (1883-1963) was regarded as one of Poquonock's history keepers. Born on lands that had been farmed by her family for eight generations, I wondered what drew Carrie to Georgia where she married her husband Alexis Dawson Kendrick (1873-1931) in 1904 and began family life.