Questions for the Future

2020-06-08T11:06:50-04:00January 3rd, 2020|

2021 marks Windsor Historical Society’s centennial year, an exciting time as we plan how to move the Society forward. The “What is our purpose?” question is as relevant today as it was a century ago.

Sarah Rowland Dudley’s Red Cloak

2019-11-07T14:24:24-05:00November 7th, 2019|Tags: , , , , , , |

Do you ever wonder how objects end up in museum exhibitions? The cloak on view in our museum gallery arrived at the Society in a box. It had ripped seams, frayed trim, insect damage, and layers of dirt. But in its prime in the early 1800s, the bright red color was a fashion statement and a sign of the owner’s wealth.

Unseasonable Night Walking

2023-12-11T16:37:46-05:00August 1st, 2019|Tags: , , , |

In 1711, Connecticut outlawed walking “in the night season” to discourage people from being out at night drunk and making a commotion. The following 1770 document from our collection reflects this law in action. It's a detailed and vivid formal complaint about some late-night shenanigans, unappreciated by the victim of those shenanigans.

Historic Fence Posts

2019-05-14T10:05:18-04:00May 9th, 2019|Tags: , |

In April of 2013, Lon Pelton and Steve Stosonis installed six distinctive fence posts at the Windsor Historical Society. These roughhewn brownstone posts date to the 18th or 19th century, and were originally located on farmland belonging to the Thrall family.

Conversations with the Past: Hayden Family Letters, 1821-1894

2019-05-17T10:23:40-04:00May 3rd, 2019|Tags: , |

Written primarily between 1821 and 1894, the Sarah Hayden Fowler Papers collection documents a 19th-century woman's life from childhood through teenage and early adult years, marriage, and life as a mother, stepmother, grandmother, and widow. Fleeting references to events, trends, and celebrities illustrate U.S. territorial expansion, changing culture, and political and economic crises.

Inadvertently Armed and Dangerous

2019-02-28T16:05:37-05:00February 28th, 2019|Tags: , , , |

Back in 2012, Windsor Historical Society’s former curator, Christina Vida, was preparing the Strong-Howard House for an ambitious reinterpretation. One of the many initial steps in implementing the project was to clean out the house, including its second floor which had been used as storage space. During this seemingly routine cleanup, we made two unique discoveries.

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